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February 21, 2011

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kathryn

Oh my these look good. I've always made Claudia's zucchini fritters and have never been tempted to stray from that recipe. Until now. Mainly because I'm intrigued by that batter. I watched a bit of Annabel Langbein one day, but couldn't quite get into it. Maybe I should give her a second chance?

And yes, that rain. But you know, of course, there will be years like this. And years where it doesn't rain at all. It's all part of the farming / gardening thing. But you must be impatient to get cracking. I know I would be.

Lucy

Claudia as in Roden? I liked yours in Wellbeing, darls, the ones I photographed waaay back. This batter's dairy-free, which means it's even more 'store cupboard', esp. if your store cupboard contains soda water.

AOF and I have an ongoing joke about Langbein's plumby (sp?) NZ accent - "soooooo de-lushes". I'd never have picked it, but she's a Kiwi, you see, and hears the subtleties more than I...but yes. She's worth another go. I found it to be garden-porn! And water-porn. Otago just looks amazing. Peter's mum and I have been talking about Annabel's show with such lust on the phone of late...once you can get past the loads of sugar and flesh, she's got some seriously good ideas. Makes her own verjuice in one episode which I was intrigued by.

Yeah...impatient, but also patient. Happy to let things just be for 12 months, see what works where, what's missing, that sort of thing. But, for example, I found myself bringing home a little fig tree while at Diggers a couple of weeks ago...already itching to plant quinces and persimmons, too!

Shari Trnka

I too love vegetable rich fritters! This winter I found even shredded cabbage, onion and parsley makes a delicious combo, especially with a ginger and tamari drizzle. Having enjoyed them plenty of times with winter squash I recently tried grated garnet yams with a touch of onion and nutmeg. These made a bit drier to make a patty which could be coated in sesame seeds made a heavenly dinner with a pile of steamed greens.
Of course our seasons are different in this part of the world (Pacific Northwest of US) but we had hardly a summer last year also. It was my first season with a new garden too so I have much sympathy for your experience. It is mud season here now but I found my first blooming violets yesterday and I'm filled with hope for what this year of gardening will bring.

Janet

yum! We make similar sorts of fritters with zucchini, or carrot, or potato and onion, cabbage and chives. Basically anything that one could grate. Except we tend to use cold beer instead of soda water (because G likes a beer and we don't tend to have soda around).

The rain this year has been amazing and somewhat of a garden challenge - we have lost plants due to them getting wet feet. I'm just trying to think of the subsoils and aquifers being replenished and hopefully years of good garden weather to follow.

another outspoken female

Annabel is "soooooooooooooooo gooooooooooooood" :) I secretly wanted to play drinking games with "delicious" and "so good" as trigger words whenever I watched the show! Just as well we never watched her together.

I made pumpkin fritters last night for dinner, stirring a little batter into the grated veg. The pumpkin got nice and melty. With the leftover batter I used some leftover fresh pineapple, made a great dessert fritter with a dollop of maple syrup.

Anh

yes! I haven't been in Melbourne much, so escaped the rainy weather. Your photo of the rain is so beautiful!

Johanna GGG

can't believe that summer is ending this week before it has truly begun! love your picture of the raindrops - sorry to hear there has been more mud and weeds than vegies but am glad the zukes have come through and made some wonderful fritters

Mariana

The addition of soda water even makes the batter "sound" lighter. I like the simplicity of your zucchini fritters. Great tip about the squeezing. I can only imagine the splattering otherwise.

Your "raining" photo really tells a story. Do you happen to have a tin or sheeting roof? We do and it's wonderful - we feel really connected with the elements. Unfortunately the sounds of running possums at night are a little too loud, but I still wouldn't change it for anything.

I laughed at you dancing in front of the dog. I can well relate. I've done the exact thing with our kangaroo. What on earth must they think? So funny.

Thanks for the mention.

Sophie

Ahh yes, the season of Zucchini is upon us. I always look forwards to it thinking how wonderful it is to have an over abundance of something. But then when it is upon us I get stressed trying not to waste an inch, racing to think of anything and everything to put them in before they turn into whales on the ground and all the neighbours lock their doors for fear they will be offered more.
So, thank you for another idea, it looks scrumptious!! And thank you as well for another beautiful and lyrical post. Inspiring!

Amanda

I simply adore cooking that requires face pulling. There is someone who still does a rather unflattering impression of me beating butter for puff pastry in culinary school. But I don't give a damn, really I don't.

That photo of the rain lashing down is heavenly - I'm sorry it's been so rotten in person though. I plan on trying these fritters as soon as spring has sprung here. They sound like light-and-melt-in-your-mouth perfection, and I wish I could be there to dance about it all for your dog too.

Cindy

Love, love, love the second photo. And I loved this fritters on sight - I think they're from the one Langbein episode I've watched. :-)

Caz

I know exactly what you mean about the ratio of vegetables to batter - more vegies, less batter is definately the way to go.

Christina

With snow on the mountains and frost every night, it is hard to imagine zucchini, but I know they will come. The soda water addition is inspired. I'm looking forward to making this come summer.

Oh rain! You and I are both so frequently gasping for it, and now you must just want it to go, go, go far away. Argh! I love the shot of the rain on the pear tree, though.

Jane Dennett

Lucinda, I made these on the weekend. They are fabulous, and have replaced my old recipe. I need to come here more often! Love from your old teacher, Jane Dennett

Lucy

Mrs D, I am so pleased! They've replaced my oldie, too. Do you know, I've been dipping into Suetonius' Twelve Caesars (picked up a copy second hand) and each time I think of you...'tis lovely this interweb, really. x

Lisa

Oh, yum. I grew up eating zucchini fritters like these, but I love the addition of soda water. In my family, my aunt was the master in the kitchen. The only way she would make these fritters — and fried zucchini blossoms as well — was by dipping them in a beer batter and frying them up in a heaping pan of olive oil. They were heaven. And so, I'm guessing, are these.

Lucy

hi Lisa: zucchini blossoms in beer batter is EXACTLY what i want to eat right now!

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